February 27, 2015

Williamstown. Photo by Laura Battles.

Williamstown 1990-2015. Photo by Laura Battles.

One Friday around noon in December 2007, Michael got a phone call from Aubrey Insurance Agency in Lexington. Lisa, the staffer who called, was a racing fan. A 17 year old stallion had been pensioned due to infertility and, having not worked out at an equine program at the University of Minnesota, was scheduled for euthanasia. “We’ve got to do something!” she said. “It’s Williamstown we’re talking about!” Do something, Michael did. He spent the day on the phone, tenacious as a bulldog, until he got to the people who needed to be got to. By that afternoon it was all arranged. Williamstown, one of the best sons of Seattle Slew, was coming to live at Old Friends.

Williamstown arrived at the farm a few days later. He was—and stayed through the very end—one of the most magnificent looking horses Old Friends has ever had the privilege to care for, a big horse whose nearly black coat was complemented by four flashy white legs and a broad white blaze. His racing career had also been distinctive. When he set his mile record at Belmont in the 1993 Withers Stakes, he bettered the time set by Conquistador Cielo, who was carrying 111 pounds. Williamstown held that mile record for ten years. To break it, Najran had to equal Dr. Fager’s world record, and was carrying 113 pounds. Williamstown had been carrying an impressive 124 pounds.

At 17, perfectly healthy aside from infertility, Williamstown wowed us as he got to know his new paddock by putting down his head, stretching his muscular body out long (shades of his great dad!) and running faster than any wind. He was a gorgeous sight thundering around, or flashing out his white legs in play, neck arched. And he put himself on duty immediately, taking on the job of guarding the farm. A house was being built nearby, and William kept his vigilant eye on the construction workers, making good and sure they toed the line. There was no way they were going to come build a house in his paddock!

Williamstown. Photo by Laura.

Williamstown. Photo by Laura.

As he aged, time told on the splendid stallion. The arthritis in one of his back legs caused him increasing mobility problems, though William continued to have good spells where for weeks or months, when the mood took him, he’d tear around his paddock like a cyclone. He could be a bit independent, maybe even aloof. He was tough, too. But with his friends, Williamstown was open, willing to meet you more than half way, and kind. He was too dignified to be a cuddler, but in his way he showed affection. He made you earn it, but if you did, he was generous.

Williamstown. Photo by Laura.

Williamstown. Photo by Laura.

When it was time to go, William let us know in no uncertain terms that he felt it was the right time to go. He went peacefully, calmly, with the confident assurance that had characterized him all his life. Williamstown was a horse with absolute class.

Beth

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February 24, 2015

photo by Tim Wilson

photo by Tim Wilson

Oh, the snow and blow that just will not go! Actually, we’ve been pretty lucky in the Kentucky Blue Grass that there hasn’t been that much blow. But do we ever have snow!

Snowy dawn at OF. Photo by TIm

Snowy dawn at OF. Photo by TIm

Fortunately, horses enjoy colder temperatures than most humans do. We humans don’t have thermoregulatory systems suited to staying comfortable and healthy in cold weather. Horses do.

Swannie when the snowfall started. Photo by Laura Battles

Swan’s Way when the snowfall started. Photo by Laura Battles

Of course, their run-in sheds and plenty of hay are essential ingredients for their cold weather well-being. So are the vigilant eyes checking who’s more comfortable blanketed and who does better without a blanket, and whether the waterers need clearing of ice, and…and…

Antonio and Yoel - feeding time. Photo by Tim

Antonio and Yoel take care of the horses’ favorite time – feeding time. Photo by Tim

…all the thousand other things our expert barn management, Tim and Carole, and energetic staff, Antonio and Yoel, spend so much of their cold weather days doing, so that each horse is getting the care to meet his or her own particular needs.

Wallenda. Photo by his good buddy, Tim

Wallenda. Photo by his good buddy, Tim

OK, now imagine doing all that work, up and down the length of a T-shaped 92 acre farm, plus additional pasturage and hay storage on the leased land on the side…in snow sometimes up to the shins…now so old and crusty you can walk on it…except where it caves in every few steps and dumps you into the snow…and you get the picture.

Little Silver Charm: "Having me in the picture makes any snow scene gorgeous."

Little Silver Charm: “Having me in the picture makes any snow scene gorgeous.” Photo by Tim

The horses are doing fine. To us humans, it’s getting a little old. Will it really soon be March? Will spring ever come?

"OK, we're a little bored. Where are those carrot-carrying summer folk?" (A certain Derby winner wants to know). Photo by Laura

“OK, we’re a little bored. Where are those carrot-carrying summer folk?” (A certain Derby winner wants to know.) Photo by Laura

Until it does, the horses are hangin’ out, sometimes seeming mildly amused at us struggling humans, sometimes inspiring and encouraging us to be more like them, to live in the present, to really feel and enjoy the warmth of the winter sun, and to enjoy the companionship of every day as it comes.

Slamming and Michael enjoy some quiet companionship. Photo by Tim

Slamming and Michael enjoy some quiet companionship. Photo by Tim

I guess Slamming and Michael say it all in this photo.

Beth

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February 10, 2015

On Saturday, January 31st a special visitor stopped by the farm. Milton Toby, award-winning turf writer and author of Noor: A Champion Thoroughbred’s Unlikely Journey from California to Kentucky took time out from his busy schedule to visit Noor’s grave. His visit also had another purpose, to see a halter that was worn by the one of racing’s historic champions and the subject of his wonderful book.

Milton Toby visits Noor's grave at Old Friends

Author Milton Toby visits Noor’s grave at Old Friends

The halter was sent to us by Cindi Anderson of Grass Valley, California and is on permanent loan to Old Friends. Cindi was very fortunate to meet Noor when as a young girl she participated in school field trips on two separate occasions. As Loma Rica Ranch was closing, ranch manager Henry Freitas gave a box of tack to his close friend Ray Crow. When Mr. Crow died, his son Steve gave the halter to Cindi. She felt it was meant for her to acquire the halter so it could make the journey to Old Friends for others to enjoy. We are very grateful to Cindi for entrusting us with her treasured artifact of racing history. On a related note, Milton will be hosting a lecture and book signing about Noor on June 2, 2015 at the Keeneland Library. The time of the event will be announced at a later date.

John

Noor stone and halter

. . .

On Saturday and Sunday, February 7 and 8, the Bluegrass basked in mild weather, the kind that brings hopes that spring may eventually arrive. The horses loved it. Visitors! Carrots! Fun! Game On Dude and Silver Charm are now as savvy about all this as the longest-time residents on the farm.

Silver Charm

Silver Charm

Game On Dude

Game On Dude

They’re both extremely intelligent, and they both enjoy interacting with people. Each has his own style. Silver Charm knows his own greatness. He confers his attention on us all as a favor. He’s very gracious to us. Like many dominant stallions, he expects to receive definite signs of respect along with our love.

Silver Charm gallops over to say hello

Silver Charm gallops over to say hello

Game On Dude doesn’t stand on ceremony. Does he know how gorgeous he is? I don’t know, but he does thoroughly enjoy being Dude. Though he’s relatively young and loves to run and play, Dude’s gentleness is becoming proverbial on the farm. He greets people with his open, interested curiosity and usually welcomes a friendly pat on the nose or neck. These two superlative champions show their class in everything they do.

20150210GoD1Silver Charm and Game On Dude each has his own paddock next to each other. At the corner where many of the tours pause to visit them is the corner of a third paddock belonging to Delay of Game, Judge’s Case, and Kudos. You may remember Kudos’ People Magazine photo bomb several years ago—a picture meant to be of Michael and Invigorate, his former race horse who he retired—transformed by Kudos’ firm belief that whatever his buddy Viggie did was at least as much his business as Viggie’s. Well, don’t these new guys realize that the paddock corner experience can never be complete unless Kudos is its main focus? At least for part of the visit.

Kudos

Kudos

Don’t these two new guys know that Kudos is a millionaire? Raced by Jerry and Ann Moss long before Zenyatta was foaled, Kudos was trained by Richard Mandella. The beautifully bred gelding—he’s by Kris S. out of a daughter of Damascus—won the Oaklawn Handicap (G1), Californian Stakes (G2), San Marino and Jim Murray Memorial handicaps. He holds the record for 1 3/16 miles on the turf at Hollywood Park in 1:51.99, a record that will now never be broken. Kudos is now 18 and he loves attention, so when you visit Silver Charm and Game On Dude, be sure to turn and tell Kudos how wonderful he is, too. We do, all the time, but he loves to hear it again and again.

Kudos applies his decade of OF expertise to get maximum carrots per tour.

Kudos applies his decade of OF expertise to get maximum carrots per tour.

Beth

photos by Laura

Lusty Latin and Stormy Passage - just hangin' out.

Lusty Latin and Stormy Passage – just hangin’ out.

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January 22, 2015

Snake - a most informal photo - with A. P. Slew. By Laura Battles.

Snake – a most informal photo – with A. P. Slew. By Laura Battles.

He couldn’t race, couldn’t be ridden, wasn’t worth breeding to. Many people would say he had nothing to give.

His dam was by the good broodmare sire Fortunate Prospect, but his sire had no business in the breeding shed. At some point early in life, the colt had broken a front ankle. He was lucky that it fused and he survived, but he could never race. Neglected and malnourished, he was stunted and oddly shaped. Nobody ever provided him any training or experience. Why bother?

At four years old, the colt was one of the 177 neglected horses seized by the state of New York from Ernie Paragallo in 2009, resulting in Paragallo’s conviction on multiple counts of cruelty to animals. The Columbia-Greene County Humane Society needed homes for those who survived, including the nameless four year old colt, lopsided and unridable, who seemed to have nothing at all going for him. Who’d want such a horse?

Old Friends was among the many people and organizations who stepped up to provide homes for these horses. Given a list to choose from, we picked Prospect Street, a nine year old daughter of our much-loved Fortunate Prospect. Her damsire being Exceller, she was the obvious perfect choice for us.

Arrival at Old Friends, April 2009. Photo by Tim Ford.

Arrival at Old Friends, April 2009. Photo by Tim Ford.

When the van arrived, to our surprise it held, not a mature mare, but an undersized, peculiar-looking colt who seemed much younger than his four years. Where was Fortunate’s daughter? But it turned out Prospect Street had not been among the survivors on the list. This was her son who’d been identified under her name since he’d never been given a name of his own.

At least, the Columbia-Greene Humane Society, New York state officials and volunteers who pitched in to help these horses thought this was Prospect Street’s son. No one could be absolutely sure. So “no-name,” thin, stunted—he was about the size of a yearling, his body too small for his head—undeveloped on the side with the broken ankle, and covered with skin fungus, came to live in Kentucky with Old Friends. What a mess he was!

Treats? July 2009. Photo by Beth Shannon.

Hi!  July 2009. Photo by Beth Shannon.

But he was sweet-natured. Despite the hardships he’d experienced in his short life, he had no distrust of people, only a foal-like curiosity. His soft eyes, cute face and childlike openness to new experiences quickly gained our affection. Old Friends doesn’t breed and has no foals, and little “no-name” was the closest thing to a baby we had. From the beginning, we found he had a lot to give.

For one thing, the fun of learning about food. Starved horses will eat their bedding, and he didn’t know the difference between hay and straw, but with encouragement he quickly realized hay was yummier and straw was great to sleep on. He had no notion what a carrot was. Why should he put that hard orange thing in his mouth? But when he did, oh boy!! For weeks we had huge fun finding him new treats to try, horse cookies, peppermints, apples, and he delighted in the variety of wonderful new tastes he’d had no idea were in the world. For a little while he hoped everything in a hand was a treat, not to mention buttons and buckles, but he didn’t become a grabber. He figured it out for himself.

He couldn’t stay “no-name.” So a little creative thinking discovered something else he had to offer: a fund raiser contest to name him. The entry fee donations benefitted his fellow residents, and he also got an apt name, contest winner Fred Jones’ inspiration from the film Escape From New York. The Jockey Club even agreed to register Escapedfromnewyork, on the condition we geld him, since without absolute certainty of his pedigree he could never breed. Of course, we geld the male horses who haven’t bred or undergone the hormonal changes into stallionhood. It makes life easier for horse and handlers, and it allows them to live with companions. Since horses are herd animals, instinctively they feel more secure in groups.

Escapedfromnewyork, summer 2009. Photo by Beth Shannon.

Escapedfromnewyork, summer 2009. Photo by Beth Shannon.

Escapedfromnewyork recovered from the minor surgery quickly and soon was bouncing around, playful with the new energy that proper nourishment gave him. By then, he’d gained not just a name, but a nickname from former film critic Michael, who called him Snake after Kurt Russell’s character in the movie. Snake also put on an astounding growth spurt. He gained size, his coat became glossy, and with the right hoof trim to help his fused ankle carry his weight better, that side developed muscle tone, and his proportions grew more balanced. Snake never lost his limp, but he could run and play and he had to spend less and less time lying down. His first paddock mate was A. P. Slew. An EPM recoverer, the little red horse didn’t push Snakey too hard physically. Soon it was Snake who began pushing A. P. Slew, though the older, more experienced horse was obviously Snake’s role model, providing needed socialization. Though Snakey copied A. P. Slew, he had his own style with visitors to the farm, an in-your-face, trusting eagerness that won hearts—and, oh boy! treats! Oh, the joy of friends and goodies!

APS and Snakey on a May evening, 2013. Photo by Laura Battles.

APS and Snakey on a May evening, 2013. Photo by Laura Battles.

Snake had nothing to offer? What about the time A. P. Slew cribbed their paddock gate off its hinges and Jack Horner-like (“what a good boy am I!”) stayed inside, while Escapedfrommypaddock! ran up and down the runs between the neighboring paddocks partying with everybody so that a good time was had by all? We closed the back gate to keep him there, but he could still have been hard to catch. Instead, when told the party was over, he willingly allowed himself to be led back to his own paddock. To him, it was all good.

As he grew in strength, Snake needed more energetic paddock mates. This year he got them, and the last year of his life was his happiest. Not quite ten years old, he had tons of energy and could keep up with pretty much anybody. He was introduced to Commentator and Fabulous Strike, along with veteran claimer Marshall Rooster.

Commentator is one smart cookie. He can come on strong, and on the track he could be merciless to his competitors. Vosburgh winner Fabulous Strike is no pushover, either. Snakey was always just a bit of a foal. But what do you know, Commentator decided Mr. Snake was one cool dude. Fabulous Strike followed suit, and Marshall Rooster too. Escapedfromnewyork became the golden boy of the herd, liked by all, the one who’d start the play going, and then they’d all race up and down the long, sloping paddock, or wrestle, or join in all the games that youngish geldings, like teenage boys, love to play.

Escapedfromnewyork, Marshall Rooster and Fabulous Strike, dinner time play, November 2014. Photo by Laura Battles.

Snake, Marshall Rooster and Fabulous Strike, dinner time play, November 2014. Photo by Laura Battles.

A horse like Escapedfromnewyork has nothing to offer? Of course, his story made him an important part of our fundraising family. But on the farm, what stood out was that in the too-short-years between his arrival in April 2009 and his fatal, colic-related, heart attack on January 18, 2015, Escapedfromnewyork gave us the delights of his discoveries and recovery, affection, laughter, and the cheerful trust of a heart that—whether or not affected by his early deprivation, and that we’ll never know—was open to people and horses alike, a kind heart that always looked for the positive and found the good in life.

Beth

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January 18, 2015

At last night’s Eclipse Awards ceremony Michael accepted a special Eclipse Award on behalf of Old Friends. In receiving horse racing’s highest honor for 2014, we are proud to be in the company of legendary race caller Tom Durkin and Barbara Livingston whose photographs have done so much to connect the spectators with the horses, and who has taken so many magical and memorable photos of our horses. We love it that Rosie Napravnik presented Old Friends’ award.

As wonderful as so many people in racing are, and as many humans contribute in many ways to Old Friends’ existence and continuation, this Eclipse Award is – above all – an acknowledgment of the horses. Along with Horse of the Year California Chrome and the other champions of 2014, Gulch and Ogygian got rounds of applause. It’s not just because they’re 31 and 32. It’s for all they and their fellow retirees have done for racing, some of them on the track and in the breeding shed, all of them for the important work they are now doing.

Silver Charm

Silver Charm

Fergus Mac Roich and He Loves Me Not

Fergus Mac Roich and He Loves Me Not

Whether they are Silver Charm, Game On Dude, the hardworking claimer Marshall Rooster, or Escapedfromnewyork who was never capable of racing, these horses, individually and all together, embody the courage, athleticism, intelligence, and willingness to give their utmost, that distinguishes these beautiful animals.

Kudos

Kudos

Highland Ack

Highland Ack

The Eclipse Award conferred on Old Friends last night recognizes staff and volunteers’ dedication and hard work and supporters’ caring and generosity. But even more, it acknowledges the awareness of the voting press, racing fans and racing participants, that the horses matter. Successful or not. Young or old. That however greatly humans contribute to the sport, horse racing is the horses.

Hidden Lake

Hidden Lake

Mixed Pleasure

Mixed Pleasure

We congratulate the horses of Old Friends on their important contribution toward the well-being of all Thoroughbreds, every time they look a visitor in the eye, amble over to give a fan who loves them the gift of their presence, pose for a photo that gets retweeted, or just nibble their hay and enjoy the mild winter sun. They are history. They are today’s spirited or relaxed enjoyment of life. They are horse racing.

Beth

photos by Laura

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January 9, 2015

Thunder Rumble 1989-2015. Photo by Connie Bush.

Thunder Rumble 1989-2015. Photo by Connie Bush.

 

Here in Kentucky, our hearts are with Joann, and the volunteers at Old Friends in New York, and all the visitors, who loved Thunder Rumble. The magnificent star of Cabin Creek Farm died January 6 from complications due to colic. Thunder was an impressive horse, intelligent, dominant, high spirited, yet a loving, loyal friend. His bond with Joann was clearly an extraordinary one, the kind that a horse person can wait a lifetime for. While there are many wonderful horses at the New York farm, and even another Travers winner, Thunder Rumble seemed to be the spirit of Cabin Creek. My love to all who were fortunate to be part of his life.

Beth

Announcement from Joann and biography of Thunder Rumble

Thunder Rumble winning the 1992 Travers Stakes

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December 26, 2014

Kiri 1

Kiri’s Clown was a healthy, strong 25. His going was nothing short of a rending shock. When he colicked on Monday, he got the best possible surgery from Dr. Scott Hopper at Rood and Riddle, and it seemed he would recover. We hoped to have him with us for a long time. But Kiri succumbed to complications following the surgery.

Bred in Florida by Gardner F. Landon & Mary A. Sullivan, Kiri’s Clown was raced as a homebred by Cobble View Stable and Sulimar, trained by the legendary P. G. Johnson and ridden by Mike Luzzi, Jean Cruget and others. His wins earning more than a million dollars, and the multiple speed records he set, are recounted in the news release on our web site.

Kiri's Clown in his racing days. Photo by Laura Battles.

Kiri’s Clown in his racing days. Photo by Laura Battles.

Of all his achievements, it’s his record-setting 1995 Sword Dancer Stakes that race fans remember best. In that mile and a half Grade 1 stakes on the grass, Kiri’s Clown beat a field that included Awad, Kissin Kris and other formidable contenders. It was Kiri’s kind of race. He grabbed the lead eagerly and early, and held it so firmly that it might have gone uncontested, had not Awad come powering like a rocket in one of the most incredibly fast moves ever seen on any track. Kiri saw him, dug deeper and put on more speed, then yet more to finish in the fastest time in which that prestigious race had ever been run. Here it is, the 1995 Sword Dancer Stakes:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-VrsDgVOXY

Kiri’s Clown was consistently good through his entire racing career. In the breeding shed he made his mark too, as the damsire of three-times G1 winner Get Stormy, who now stands at Crestwood Farm in Kentucky.

The public achievements of Kiri’s Clown are indisputable, but they may not be what his visitors in retirement will remember best. Kiri arrived at Old Friends in August 2006, a month after I began volunteering on the farm. Some horses settle in at once, others take longer to get into the pleasures of retired life. At first, Kiri didn’t really want to step down. One of the first things he did was manage to get his paddock gate off its hinges, and for the next week or two he kept hoping he could do it again. That first month, he spent a lot of time just staring into the distance. “What does Kiri’s Clown want?” Michael asked Jean Cruget, who’d ridden him as a youngster. Jean shook his head. “Speed, speed and more speed,” he said. Doing Saturday tours, I’d try to get him interacting with his visitors. “Earth to Kiri!” I’d say, but he’d just accept the carrots and look into the faraway.

Then, in September, everything changed. Awad came! Kiri took one look at his old racing rival, and leapt eagerly into the here and now. From 2006 through 2010, those two were engaged in the friendship neither of them would admit was a friendship at all, but it was one of the most intense on the farm. You can’t tell me they didn’t remember each other. Horses have better memories than humans in some ways, and the Sword Dancer wasn’t the only time Kiri’s Clown and Awad squared off against each other. On June 10, 1995 in the Manhattan Handicap at Belmont, Kiri set a blistering pace only to be passed at the end by two horses, one the winner Awad. On July 29, Kiri held off Awad’s shark-quick run in the Sword Dancer. Both shipped (together? I wonder) to Chicago for the Arlington Million, where Awad won. Whatever Kiri remembered when Awad appeared, it gave retirement a purpose for him. One upping Awad could take many forms. He could impress his old rival with his stallionly fierceness, he could vie with him for carrots, and whether the two wanted to admit it or not, they spent a whole lot of time just hanging out together, right across the fence from each other. When Awad died, Kiri went in his run-in shed and didn’t come out much for three days.

Kiri's Clown 2014. Photo by Laura Battles.

Kiri’s Clown 2014. Photo by Laura Battles.

But Kiri was a trooper. Life went on, and the interest and pleasure in retirement that he’d gained never left him. His name was probably inspired by a combination of his parents’ names, Kiri and Foolish Pleasure, but he rarely seemed a clown. I was always impressed by a particular innate dignity that he had, almost an aloofness, though he also had a definite graciousness. Something about him was refined, too, as if he were really, beneath the daily trivia, made of wind. The pure joy of a speeding wind.

Beth

Kiri's Clown 2014. Photo by Laura Battles.

Kiri’s Clown 2014. Photo by Laura Battles.

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December 24, 2014

This should be a joyful season, but we have just lost two much-loved residents. This post and the next will honor them. I hope all who ever visited them, or watched them race, or played a part in their lives, will take a moment to remember two horses at opposite ends of the Thoroughbred spectrum, the G1-winning, record-setting millionaire Kiri’s Clown who came to OF generously supported by his former owner, Mary Sullivan, and the hard luck claimer A. P. Slew who came to us as an unwanted horse. The two faced differing challenges, and in each, his way, triumphed. Each deserves full recognition, so each will get his own post, in the order they left us. First, A. P. Slew, who passed December 21. The next post will honor Kiri’s Clown, who passed on December 22.

A. P. Slew. Photo by Laura Battles.

A. P. Slew. Photo by Laura Battles.

A. P. Slew was exceptionally pretty and his pedigree had much to offer, but physical issues discouraged buyers at the Keeneland yearling sale. So he raced for his breeders, the Allen E. Paulson family. Continuing to battle issues, he debuted at 4 years old at Hollywood Park, where he raced well but didn’t win. In fact, that describes most of his 56 races. He usually finished close to the front but won only 3 times. A. P. Slew didn’t lack talent or determination, but he was a bleeder. Typically, he’d be in strong contention, often on the lead, then congestion would impede him. Yet his tough will power earned him plenty of 2nd and 3rd place finishes.

A. P. Slew, 2008. Photo by Karyn Pirello.

A. P. Slew, 2008. Photo by Karyn Pirello.

Like many who drop in class, A. P. Slew eventually left the premiere tracks for lesser ones. A horse’s lot can be rougher there, especially if he or she is acquired by outfits that deserve their lack of success. A. P. Slew’s last two racing years were grim and ended with a decision to send him to slaughter.

Responsible, excellent horse people also work at blue collar tracks. A. P. Slew was lucky to be on the radar of one responsible person who networked with others, and A. P. Slew was bought out of danger. He’d beat the odds for the first time.

The 9 year old needed a home. He went to the Kentucky Equine Humane Center, but two years of mistreatment had made him unadoptable. Being a self-respecting horse, A. P. Slew was no longer giving people a chance to hurt him. He was hurting them first. Adopting him out would have been unsafe. The alternative was humane euthanization. But KyEHC personnel could see the little red horse wasn’t vicious, just desperate. Given a few years of patience, he might learn to trust again. KyEHC called Old Friends. A. P. Slew had beat the odds a second time.

Not being ready to greet visitors at Dream Chase Farm, in 2008 he lived at our excellent satellite a few miles to the east where the very best of care slowly regained his confidence in people. His responses to affection could be a little funny, but he did respond. In his way, he blossomed, making friends with Hussonfirst as well as his caregivers and the volunteers who visited him in his quiet home. He became quite possessive of “his” particular humans.

A. P. Slew was not quite sure about us yet. 2008.

A. P. Slew was not quite sure about us yet. 2008.

Then EPM struck. Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis is a parasite that can cause neurologic deterioration. Despite treatment, A. P. Slew nearly died. But he hung tough, and with encouragement from the people he’d begun trusting, he pulled through. He beat enormous odds for the third time.

Recovery from the effects of EPM can be much slower than recovery from the infection itself. A. P. Slew never stopped recovering. Moving to Dream Chase Farm and showing his sweetness to all he met, he also improved in coordination, eye sight and muscle tone. By the time he reached 15 he was nearing 100%. And at last A. P. Slew achieved the success that had eluded him on the track:  He became the undisputed boss of his small herd. He loved it. He also enjoyed that paddock’s access to visitors. Especially, he enjoyed peppermints.

But on the dark solstice at the end of 2014, A. P. Slew colicked. I won’t sugar coat it. He battled acute distress. But it was a measure of the goodness of his life at OF that when staff and volunteers hurried to his aid, he ran to them for help. We tried our hardest to fulfill his trust. He had surgery from the best at Rood and Riddle. But finally, the odds beat A. P. Slew. He was tough, though. Nobody ever struggled harder to make it, and it took persistent ill-luck four hard tries to take him down.

I have known more successful race horses, but I have never known a horse more valiant than A. P. Slew.

Beth

A. P. Slew - the good life, 2013. Photo by Laura Battes.

A. P. Slew – the good life, 2013. Photo by Laura Battes.

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December 14, 2014

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Silver Charm is doing fantastic. He’s got a great personality, proud yet kind, smart, friendly and full of a very special confident poise all his own. No question that he knows who he is, but he’s gracious. As Michael says, “He’s settling into life at Old Friends like the champion he is.” As our barn manager Tim says, “The classy ones, the smart ones, make everything easy on themselves and on us.”

Silver Charm meets Michael the day he arrives, after his reunion with Sandy Hatfield. Photo by Laura Battles.

Silver Charm meets Michael the day he arrives, after his reunion with Sandy Hatfield. Photo by Laura Battles.

It was Sandy Hatfield, his groom when he stood at Three Chimneys, who introduced the 1997 Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner to Old Friends the day he arrived, and who joined him again the next day for his meeting with the fans and the press. The cooperative efforts of the Japan Bloodhorse Breeding Association (JBBA), the Lewis family and Three Chimneys on behalf of this superstar’s retirement when his stud career was done are an exemplary instance of how we can all work together in the best interests of the horses who go overseas once they have finished their work toward the international development of the breed. It shows the best of worldwide respect for these equine athletes.

And we at Old Friends are over the moon that besides getting to have Silver Charm with us, we’re getting the benefit of Sandy’s expertise. She’s now an Old Friends volunteer!

To be sure, Silver Charm may have wondered what kind of place this was at first when it did nothing but rain, but this week the rain let up and we even had some sun. Temperatures in the Blue Grass have been fairly mild and Silver Charm has been getting to know his new digs.

Silver Charm enjoys the lake view. Photo by Tim Wilson.

Silver Charm enjoys the lake view. Photo by Tim Wilson.

...and the view of Game On Dude in his paddock. Photo by Tim Wilson.

…and the view of Game On Dude in his paddock. Photo by Tim Wilson.

What an interesting place this is! And who are all these new neighbors? Photo by Tim Wilson.

What an interesting place this is! And who are all these new neighbors? Photo by Tim Wilson.

Of course, he’ll also ease into his new job visiting with his fans and playing whatever part he enjoys playing in Old Friends’ teamwork to enhance the general public’s appreciation for the accomplishments of race horses, the care deserved by all retired Thoroughbreds, and the wellbeing of all horses. While still in quarantine he’ll get to watch tours and get a sense of the routine. Importing a stallion from overseas includes some additional tests required by the Federal government, so it’s hard to say exactly when his quarantine will be over, but by that time no doubt he’ll have noticed the carrot aspect of his fellow residents’ job. As for meeting, greeting, and being the star he is, he’s clearly already a total expert at all that. We’re already in love with his beautiful guy and look forward to every step of what we hope and trust will be his long and fun retirement.

It's nice to come to a place where you have fans. Photo by Laura Battles.

It’s nice to come to a place where you have fans. Photo by Laura Battles.

 

The other new development that has us tickled pink is how well the two newest paddock mates on the farm, Rail Trip and Catlaunch, are hitting it off. They’re just about inseparable, playing together, grazing together, and hanging out together, in the paddock behind Gulch’s. Mixed Pleasure has moved to the lakeside paddock across from Afternoon Deelites and is forming a friendship over the fence with Geri in the neighboring paddock.

Rail Trip and Catlaunch on their first day together. Photo by Tim Wilson.

Rail Trip and Catlaunch on their first day together. That’s Geronimo and Sea Native in the background. Photo by Tim Wilson.

Though Rail Trip was a national star based in California and Catlaunch ruled Ohio racing, the two geldings probably have plenty in common, both being millionaires and all.

2010 Breeders’ Cup Marathon winner Eldaafer still prefers his goats.

Eldaafer and Google. Photo by Laura Battles.

Eldaafer and Google. Photo by Laura Battles.

And Escapedfromnewyork, Marshall Rooster, Fabulous Strike & Commentator say, “Boys just want to have fun.”

Dinner time play. Escapedfromnewyork, Marshall Rooster, Fabulous Strike and Commentator. Photo by Laura Battles.

Dinner time play. Escapedfromnewyork, Marshall Rooster, Fabulous Strike and Commentator. Photo by Laura Battles.

From all of them to all of you, the very merriest of Christmases!

Beth

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November 23, 2014

He’s coming…

Silver Charm in his racing days. Photo by Laura Battles.

Silver Charm in his racing days. Photo by Laura Battles.

Excitement is rising at Old Friends – and we’re very busy! – as we prepare for the arrival of 1997 Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner Silver Charm at the end of the month. If you missed the news, here’s the original announcement in the Blood-Horse.

As most readers of this blog probably know, Silver Charm will not be available for visits immediately. Like Game On Dude and Amazombie a few months ago, he will be in quarantine. We take the safety precaution of quarantine very seriously and will enforce it. Here’s our barn manager, Tim Wilson, explaining why quarantine is so important Tim starts at 1:05, but don’t skip Dude and Amazombie (or the end)!

But soon as quarantine is over and the 1997 Derby and Preakness winner has had a chance to settle in comfortably, we have all kinds of fun in the works. We hope you’ll come visit Silver Charm and participate in the other celebratory events with us! Keep your eye on the OF web site, Facebook page and this blog for more information.

Silver Charm’s upcoming arrival, and Ava Lotta Hope’s unexpected going from us, have combined for me in good memories and warm thoughts of another mare we loved and remember with fondness, smiles, and gratitude for the happy times she shared with us:  Silver Charm’s mother, the tough-knocking race horse, superlative dam, and lovely, lovely lady, Bonnie’s Poker (1982-2010). It’s prompted me to go back into my old photos and I’d like to share a few pictures of her during her years at Old Friends. They’re not up to Laura’s standards, just snapshots, but I hope you’ll enjoy them.

Beth

Bonnie's Poker, dam of Silver Charm, at OF, May 2009

Bonnie’s Poker, dam of Silver Charm, at OF, May 2009

Bonnie's Poker and her best friend, Narrow Escape, enjoy the first snowfall of winter, 2008

Bonnie’s Poker and her best friend, Narrow Escape, enjoy the first snowfall of winter, 2008

Bonnie in the snow, another winter

Bonnie in the snow, another winter

And another piccie, same day

And another pic, same day

Bonnie and Narrow Escape enjoy a mutual scratch,

Bonnie and Narrow Escape enjoy a mutual scratch,

Bonnie in October 2008

Bonnie in October 2008

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